The Mario Blog
01.23.2017—2am
The role of WED in creating a rich palette of visual storytelling for mobile

During our past three posts, we have concentrated on the applications of the WED (Writing/Editing/Design) philosophy to the way we tell stories visually for mobile devices in particular. Today we take a look at the most recent New York Times internal report and its call for more visual presentation of the news.

During our past three posts, we have concentrated on the applications of the WED (Writing/Editing/Design) philosophy to the way we tell stories visually for mobile devices in particular.

I have emphasized that, as a student of how stories are presented, and, specifically, the type of story structures that are created to present different stories, I admire the work currently carried out by The New York Times, where many stories are presented in a linear way, with a blending of narratives and imagery.

The New York Times internal report

The New York Times recently released its second internal report which makes it clear that, while much progress has been made in the way Times stories are told, it is not enough. The report, titled “Journalism That Stands Apart,” but often referred to as the 2020 report,

The report begins with “The New York Times has deftly adapted to the demands of digital journalism, but it needs to change even more quickly,”.

For visual storytellers, this report is inspiring and forward looking, with statements like this:

“Among the other recommendations in The Times’s report were reducing duplicative layers of article editing, and having visual experts play “the primary role covering some stories” — part of an urgent call for more visual journalism”

The report is introspective and brutally honest:

“The Times publishes about 200 pieces of journalism every day. This number typically includes some of the best work published anywhere. It also includes too many stories that lack significant impact or audience — that do not help make The Times a valuable destination.”

“The most poorly read stories, it turns out, are often the most “dutiful” — incremental pieces, typically with minimal added context, without visuals and largely undifferentiated from the competition. They frequently do not clear the bar of journalism worth paying for, because similar versions are available free elsewhere.”

A highlight of the report:

“The report needs to become more visual:The Times has an unparalleled reputation for excellence in visual journalism. We have defined multimedia storytelling for the news industry and established ourselves as the clear leader. Yet despite our excellence, not enough of our report uses digital storytelling tools that allow for richer and more engaging journalism. Too much of our daily report remains dominated by long strings of text.”

Why the NYT report is an eye opener, full of opportunities

“We also need to become more comfortable with our photographers, videographers and graphics editors playing the primary role covering some stories, rather than a secondary role. The excellent journalism already being produced by these desks serves as a model.

“Given our established excellence in this area, creating a more visual daily report is an enormous opportunity.”

 

The story structures of the digital age

The NYT report emphasizes that “we have dozens of regularly appearing features built for the print edition but not enough for a digital ecosystem. We need more journalistic forms that make The Times a habit by frequently enlightening readers on major running stories, through email newsletters, alerts, FAQs, scoreboards, audio, video and forms yet to be invented.”

I have outlined a few of those new story structures or forms that are particularly good examples of WED, where the fusion of writing/editing/design fits perfect to tell stories for mobile. Take a look.

A palette for visual storytelling

The following stories, all published by The New York Times, show us clear and easy to understand examples of combining narratives, good navigation and visuals.

Breaking News: What We Know/Don't Know

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/17/world/europe/tumult-in-turkey-what-we-know-and-what-we-dont-know.html

Breaking News: Live Analysis/Chat 
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/08/31/us/politics/trump-immigration-speech-live.html

Breaking News: Cinemagraphic Essay
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/12/16/world/middleeast/aleppo-evacuations-video.html

Quiz/Game
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/04/01/us/police-bodycam-video.html

Breaking News: Explainer

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/12/22/world/americas/trump-nuclear-tweet.html

Photo Story

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/27/world/middleeast/iraq-mosul-isis-car-bombs.html

Multimedia Story

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/06/22/world/americas/panama-canal.html

Previously and related

Visual storytelling via linear thinking:narrative of the story blends with the images accompanying it. http://www.garciamedia.com/blog/digital_storytelling_part_two_a_linear_fusion_of_narrative_imagery

Digital storytelling, Part One: The fusion of writing/editing/design
http://www.garciamedia.com/blog/digital_storytelling_part_one_the_fusion_of_writing_editing_design

Designers of all ages: Let’s rethink, reinvent and recharge
http://www.garciamedia.com/blog/designers_of_all_ages_lets_rethink_reinvent_and_recharge

TheMarioBlog post #2553

Blog Post05.26.2017—1am
New book: Designing for Touch
Blog Post05.25.2017—1am
Medium redesigns homepage: curated content is the key
Blog Post05.24.2017—1am
It’s the new storytelling, the new editing, the new design
Blog Post05.23.2017—1am
Millennials and their obsession with their phones—publishers, take note!
Blog Post05.22.2017—1am
Spiegel Daily: the German magazine’s new product
Blog Post05.19.2017—1am
Another day, another Trump bombshell for the front pages
Blog Post05.18.2017—1am
From digital to print: another example
Blog Post05.16.2017—6am
Trump bombshell news lands on the front pages
Blog Post—1am
For The Guardian: one contributor at a time
Blog Post05.15.2017—1am
The New York Times banks on kids: never too early!
Blog Post05.12.2017—1am
Good guide to e-newsletters that catch the reader’s attention
Blog Post05.10.2017—2pm
The firing of the FBI Director on Page One
Blog Post—1am
Sarasota Herald Tribune gets new look
Blog Post05.08.2017—8am
The Macron victory in France through the front pages
Blog Post—1am
Tony Awards: And the winner so far…..
Blog Post05.05.2017—1am
And now Dubai has its own font!
Blog Post05.04.2017—7am
The NYTimes’ Sketchbook: great visual solutions
Blog Post05.03.2017—1am
The luxury of paper
Blog Post05.02.2017—1am
Trump: 100 days and the front pages
Blog Post04.28.2017—2am
And now the annual report via Virtual Reality
Blog Post04.27.2017—2am
Digital down market? Yep, it’s the HuffPost’
Blog Post04.26.2017—2am
When digital products transition to print
Blog Post04.24.2017—9pm
Agustin Edwards: Death of a media patriarch
Blog Post04.22.2017—8am
The best designed newspapers in the world
Blog Post04.21.2017—1am
It’s Allium, Cyrus Highsmith’s new font creation
Blog Post04.20.2017—1am
For mobile ads, too, scrolling is the way to go
Blog Post04.19.2017—1am
NYT: Linear, visual storytelling at its best
Blog Post04.18.2017—1am
Gulf News: the evolution of sponsored content in Dubai
Blog Post04.12.2017—1am
Austria: The marketing of a newspaper
Blog Post04.11.2017—1am
NYT: What a difference a continent makes
Blog Post04.10.2017—1am
High school journalists’ investigative work produces results
Blog Post04.07.2017—1am
Some interesting weekend reads: innovation, new products, new numbers
Blog Post04.06.2017—1am
Print can be big, too
Blog Post04.05.2017—2am
The first Spanish-language newspaper for children is here
Blog Post04.04.2017—1am
Design thinking for journalists, why not?
Blog Post04.03.2017—2am
It’s a new look for the Las Vegas Review Journal
Blog Post03.31.2017—2am
Highlights of my webinar
Blog Post03.30.2017—7am
It’s the era of templates
Blog Post03.29.2017—1am
The role of print in my students’ lives
Blog Post03.28.2017—1am
Journalists and cocktail parties: not a happy mojito these days
Contact us with speaking requests, questions or to discuss a project.